Weekly Feature



2016-02-24 / Lifestyles

Buffalo Mini Maker Faire

celebrates invention, ‘do it yourself’ spirit
by ANNA WALTERS Reporter


At the 2014 Buffalo Mini Maker Faire, a maker uses a torch for glass working. This year’s faire will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at the Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo. Admission costs $11 for adults and $9 for seniors, children ages 2-17, and students and military with valid identification. There is no charge for children younger than 2 or for members of the museum with their membership identification. At the 2014 Buffalo Mini Maker Faire, a maker uses a torch for glass working. This year’s faire will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at the Buffalo Museum of Science, 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo. Admission costs $11 for adults and $9 for seniors, children ages 2-17, and students and military with valid identification. There is no charge for children younger than 2 or for members of the museum with their membership identification. David Cinquino says the Buffalo Mini Maker Faire is a giant show and tell. The event, hosted by the Buffalo Museum of Science, brings together a diverse mix of makers, such as woodworkers, tech enthusiasts, crafters, amateur scientists, tinkers, and children who build and design their own stuff.

“A lot of us are makers; we make things. We may or may not realize it,” said Cinquino, who is the museum’s exhibits director. The third annual Buffalo Mini Maker Faire will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo.

A young maker named Carmine Santo sits on a throne he designed out of foam blocks at the Buffalo Museum of Science. The 4 (and ¾)-year-old directed his father as to where the blocks, high off the ground, should be placed.

A young maker named Carmine Santo sits on a throne he designed out of foam blocks at the Buffalo Museum of Science. The 4 (and ¾)-year-old directed his father as to where the blocks, high off the ground, should be placed.

A call for makers is open until Monday, March 14. There is no minimum age restriction, and young makers are encouraged to apply. Applications are available at www.sciencebuff.org/site/learn-and-explore-menu/events/makerfaire.

“These people are proud of what they’re able to do. They want to share that passion,” Cinquino said. “And I really do feel there’s a very passionate group of people out there that want to share that and teach other people.”

Cinquino gave examples of applicants, including a young person who tells the story of “Star Wars” through Legos; a teacher from Pittsburgh who teaches robotics to children; and someone who makes antique nails.

“I think people have the desire to make things.”

On the Buffalo Mini Maker Faire blog, individuals are being featured who demonstrate the “maker spirit.” A current post highlights visual artist Mark Snyder, who will be at this year’s maker faire. He dissects auto-racing icons, such as dragsters, and reconstructs them into sculptural objects.

Also on the blog is a young maker named Carmine Santo who was found creating at the museum with his father.

According to Cinquino, the 4(and ¾)-year-old was directing his father where to put blue foam blocks. Acting as the brain behind the project, the young maker constructed a throne for a castle with a moat in front.

The maker faire is looking for people who’ve come up with interesting and novel ideas. Cinquino said some people have an interesting idea and figure out how to do it another way to make it useful again.

“There’s one young lady who has applied who takes recycled shopping bags, twists them up and weaves them into baskets.”

The event will take place throughout the entire museum and outside, and will be divided into vendors, teachers and demonstrators. “Personally, I think America needs to go back to making things instead of just consuming things,” Cinquino added.

Last year, rockets were blasted off, and the maker faire had homemade hula hoops.

“We’ve always had at least one blacksmith person here,” he said.

The multi-generational event has expanded from around 1,000 to 3,000 attendees. Cinquino is hoping for a bigger turnout at this year’s maker faire.

“It grows in a couple different ways. Our audience keeps getting bigger, but so does the interesting and dynamic types of makers that we’re meeting.”

The maker faire also will showcase the diversity of creators from different industries, ranging from 3D-printing to gardening to machinists.

“We’re makers every day here,” Cinquino said of the exhibits team, which comes up with ideas and assembles materials.

The Foundry, Western New York Book Arts and Thimble, a successful Kickstarter project, will be at the event.

According to Cinquino, Thimble allows individuals to learn and build electronics with delivered kits.

“It’s a chance to meet other people that might have a similar interest as you. Everybody from the hobbyist to somebody who wants to start their own business.”

For more information, visit www.sciencebuff.org or www.makerfairebuffalo.com.

email: awalters@beenews.com

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